What is G-Force

The gravity’s force on a specific celestial body or the force of acceleration is called G-force. The measurements of g-force use gs, where 1 g is equivalent to earth’s surface gravity, which is 9.8 meters per second. A person experiencing g-force in a solid box is not capable of telling whether its source lies in the space acceleration or gravitational field except they had some means of looking outside the box. The g-force analysis is very vital in the different fields of science and engineering, especially rocket science, planetary science astrophysics and engineering of different machineries like racecars, fighter jets and massive engines.

Humans can withstand localized g-force in the hundreds of g’s for a split seconds like a slap on the face for instance. However, continuous g-force more than 10 g’s can lead to permanent injuries or even death. There are substantial differences among individuals when it comes to tolerance in g-force. For instance, a racecar driver can bear immediate acceleration of about 214 g during accidents. In an experiment with rocket sled to determine the effects of high acceleration to the human body in 1954, Colonel John Stapp took 46.2 g for several seconds. Normally, it is fatal when the body is experienced acceleration more than 100 g even for a brief amount of time.

Humans experience g-force stronger than 1 g in their everyday life. A normal sneeze results in about 3 g’s, while a cough creates 3.5 g’s amount of g-force. Roller coasters are designed usually to run under 3 g, although there are few exceptions that create as much as 6.7 g.

Minimal increase in g-force is expected in any moving machinery like trains, cars, elevators and planes. However, astronauts in the orbit are experiencing 0 g or weightlessness. G-force varies on different celestial bodies or planets. When an object contains greater amount of mass, it creates a higher gravitational field.

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One Response to “What is G-Force”

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